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Tag Archives: yashica tlr

TLR Review: Yashica D

A.E.Pearson Photography.

AE Pearson posted a good review on Yashica D. I agree that the differences of the Yashikor lens and Yashinon lens is not significant… based on my personal experience. (I have 4 copies of Yashica D, 2 with Yashikor lens and 2 with Yashinon lens.)

 

Yashica D TLR Review – The BEST Budget Medium Format Camera Ever Made!

As with many photographers, I myself am a bit of a HUGE photography equipment nerd. It’s hard not to be honestly. There are so many incredibly cool cameras, think about some of the factors that contribute to the diversity for a second:

  • 150 years or so of research and development
  • Varying film formats (a variety of small, medium, and large formats)
  • Consumer taste
  • Manufacturing and materials trends and developments
  • Competition!
Being a photographer, I have the fortunate disposition of being in a field where the tools of my trade are often bona-fide antiques. For a guy that spends weekends wandering through thrift shops and antique stores, it’s a blessing. I mean, not only are some of the older cameras I’ve owned absolutely gorgeous pieces of mechanical beauty – but they TAKE FREAKIN’ PICTURES. Yes, that’s right, even my 100 year old folder camera my aunt gave me takes pictures. After all this time – they are still relevant tools of the trade.
Ah. Mazing.
With all that said, I have owned/use a LARGE variety of cameras. Whether it be 16mm, 35mm, Medium Format, or Large Format – I’m on a perpetual search for the “perfect camera”.
The *right* camera isn’t always affordable – but then comes the Yashica D. This camera is, in my opinion, one of the best all-around medium format cameras on the market. It’s not a Hasselblad, or a Rollei…but it’s also something you can find ALL DAY LONG for well under $100. This one, in the incredible condition it’s in, set me back $81. If you are reading this you probably are aware of the current used prices these days of quality medium format cameras, and you are probably picking your jaw up off the ground right now too ($81?!?!).Why do I love it, and why should you go buy one RIGHT NOW?

  • The fit is near perfect. The layout of the winding knob, focus knob, shutter speed and aperture dials, shutter cocking lever, and shutter release button are all in just the right spot to be used without confusion and, after getting used to it, without even looking. This, to me, is HUGELY important.
  • Sharp optics. Apparently there are two different versions of the 80mm f/3.5 lens that comes with this camera. Yashikor and Yashinon (I think?). If you care about the “expert” reviews on the internet about these two lenses, you’d probably be convinced that the Yashikor is worthless and not sharp. And, you would be wrong. If I can say one thing about reading camera reviews online it’s that they are mostly based on rumor and not actual experience. Take everything you read with a grain of salt.
  • The “feel”. This camera just feels right. When you are holding it, its hard to ignore the voice in your head that tells you to grab a handful of film and get to shooting. Seriously.
  • Ease of use. There is no bulky and unreliable meter built into this camera. All you need is a handheld meter or the good ol’ Sunny 16 rule. This camera is just plain simple. Everything about it just WORKS.
  • Design. It’s beautiful, isn’t it? And, man, this thing is SOLID. Compared to the Yashica Mat 124G (of which I’ve owned a few), even though it’s essentially the same camera, it just feels much more solid and well thought out. Also, the lens is fixed and not interchangeable – to some this is a negative attribute, to me, this is more of a reason to buy one. Keep it simple.
  • The price. Very affordable.

So kids, if you are in love with medium format – or just getting started – I HIGHLY recommend this camera for you. You will not be disappointed.If you are looking for more technical resources regarding this camera, please take a moment to check these links out:

http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Yashica-D



Yashica D TLR Review - The BEST Budget Medium Format Camera Ever Made!<br /> As with many photographers, I myself am a bit of a HUGE photography equipment nerd. It’s hard not to be honestly. There are so many incredibly cool cameras, think about some of the factors that contribute to the diversity for a second:<br /> 150 years or so of research and development<br /> Varying film formats (a variety of small, medium, and large formats)<br /> Consumer taste<br /> Manufacturing and materials trends and developments<br /> Competition!<br /> Being a photographer, I have the fortunate disposition of being in a field where the tools of my trade are often bona-fide antiques. For a guy that spends weekends wandering through thrift shops and antique stores, it’s a blessing. I mean, not only are some of the older cameras I’ve owned absolutely gorgeous pieces of mechanical beauty - but they TAKE FREAKIN’ PICTURES. Yes, that’s right, even my 100 year old folder camera my aunt gave me takes pictures. After all this time - they are still relevant tools of the trade. <br /> Ah. Mazing.<br /> With all that said, I have owned/use a LARGE variety of cameras. Whether it be 16mm, 35mm, Medium Format, or Large Format - I’m on a perpetual search for the “perfect camera”. <br /> The *right* camera isn’t always affordable - but then comes the Yashica D. This camera is, in my opinion, one of the best all-around medium format cameras on the market. It’s not a Hasselblad, or a Rollei…but it’s also something you can find ALL DAY LONG for well under $100. This one, in the incredible condition it’s in, set me back $81. If you are reading this you probably are aware of the current used prices these days of quality medium format cameras, and you are probably picking your jaw up off the ground right now too ($81?!?!).Why do I love it, and why should you go buy one RIGHT NOW? </p> <p>The fit is near perfect. The layout of the winding knob, focus knob, shutter speed and aperture dials, shutter cocking lever, and shutter release button are all in just the right spot to be used without confusion and, after getting used to it, without even looking. This, to me, is HUGELY important.<br /> Sharp optics. Apparently there are two different versions of the 80mm f/3.5 lens that comes with this camera. Yashikor and Yashinon (I think?). If you care about the “expert” reviews on the internet about these two lenses, you’d probably be convinced that the Yashikor is worthless and not sharp. And, you would be wrong. If I can say one thing about reading camera reviews online it’s that they are mostly based on rumor and not actual experience. Take everything you read with a grain of salt.<br /> The “feel”. This camera just feels right. When you are holding it, its hard to ignore the voice in your head that tells you to grab a handful of film and get to shooting. Seriously.<br /> Ease of use. There is no bulky and unreliable meter built into this camera. All you need is a handheld meter or the good ol’ Sunny 16 rule. This camera is just plain simple. Everything about it just WORKS.<br /> Design. It’s beautiful, isn’t it? And, man, this thing is SOLID. Compared to the Yashica Mat 124G (of which I’ve owned a few), even though it’s essentially the same camera, it just feels much more solid and well thought out. Also, the lens is fixed and not interchangeable - to some this is a negative attribute, to me, this is more of a reason to buy one. Keep it simple. <br /> The price. Under $100 for a killer medium format camera. Yes. Please.</p> <p>So kids, if you are in love with medium format - or just getting started - I HIGHLY recommend this camera for you. You will not be disappointed.If you are looking for more technical resources regarding this camera, please take a moment to check these links out: http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Yashica-D<br /> http://mattdentonphoto.com/cameras/yashica_d.html<br /> http://www.butkus.org/chinon/yashica/yashica_d/yashica_d.htm<br />

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Approaches to replace mercury px625 battery

What is mercury px625?

The PX625 (also referred to by other names such as PX13) is a small button-shaped 1.35volt mercury battery which great number of camera models were designed to use.

Before the manufacture of mercury batteries was banned, many cameras were designed to use them. Because mercury batteries produced a constant and reliable voltage, many cameras were built without any voltage regulation in the metering circuitry. Unless preventative measures are taken, use of other kinds of batteries gives erratic exposures and meter readings.

Brands and Cameras designed to use px625 battery

Manufacturer/Brand Model
Agfa Optima 500 Sensor, Selectronic, Selectronic S, Agfamatic 300/4000/4008/5008/6008, Optima 535/1035/5000/5008/6000/6008
Alpa 9d
Argus 270 Insta-Load
Bell & Howell FD35, Autoload 340/341, Auto Reflex Dial 35
Bronica C2, S2
Canon FT, FTb, FTbn, FT-QL, TX, TLb, EF, F1 (some), Ex, EX EE Auto, A35F, Demi 17, Demi EE 17, Canonet QL17/QL19/19E/25/19E, Canonet New QL17/New QL17L/New QL19/New 28/G-III 17/G-III 19
Chinon SLR, 1000EL pocket, CS, CXII
Dacora Rapid D101, D202, D404
Edixa LTL, 35MM, Prismat, Amica Auto,TL 1000
Exakta TL1000, RTL1000, Examat & Travemat meter finders
Fuji/Fujica 35FS, 35GP, V2
GAF Corporation L-14, L-17, L-CM, L-CS, Anscomatic 726, Autoset Cds
GAF Bernard Auto 35, Model 503, Viceroy 5000
Hanimex 35EE, 35SL, 120, 620, Compact A
Hasselblad Meter Prism Finder CdS
Kalimar K650, K431 Cds meter, K433 zone meter, Zanit 2000CTL
Keystone K609H, K610H, K616D, K164H, K615H, K1010 Auto
Kiev 60 TTL (2 each)
Kodak AG Retina IIF
Konica AutoReflex T4/TC/Autorex, Auto S/S1.6/S2/S261 meter, EE-Matic, EE-Matic Deluxe F/FM, c35/c35 Flashmatic
Kowa SE, SER, SET, SETR, SETR2, 6, 6 MM, Super 66
Leica CL, M5, Leicaflex SL/SL2/SL-MOT/SL2-MOT
Minolta SRT 100/101/200/201/202, SR 1/7/7V/100/102/200/201/202, AL-F, AL-E, Autopack 700, Himatic 7/7s/9/11
Minox 110S
Miranda Sensorex, Automex II/III, F, FM
Nikon F, FTn, FT, T, Tn, Nikkormat FT/FTn/FT2
Olympus 35 series: 35DC/35LC/35RC/35RD/35SC/35SP/35SPN/35UC, EED, Pen FT, FTL, M-1, OM-1, OM-1MD, OM-1n
J.C. Penny SLR2/SLR3
Petri FT, FTIII, F1X, Racer, Petriflex 7
Praktica TL, TL1000, Super TL/TL2/TL3, LTL, LTL3, MTL3, MTL5, Praktica 66 meter, Prakticamat
Ricoh Simplex, Simplex II, SLX 500, TLS 400/EE
Rollei 35, 35S, 35T, 35 Classic, A26, 126, XF35, Rolleiflex SL35, SL35M, SL26
Spiratone Spiraflex TTL
Topcon RE Super, Super DM, 135EE
Vivitar 35EE, 35EF, 35ES
Voigtländer VF101, VS1
Yashica MAT 124, MAT 124G, Y12, Y24, Half 14, Lynx 14/14E/5000, Ministar 700D, Penta J3/J4/J5/J7
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex 126/SLF, Contarex Super/Super BC, Icarex 35S/35CS, SL706
Zenit Zenit TTL, Zenit 16, Zenit 18, Zenit 19, Zenit , Zenit Avtomat, Zenit AM, Zenit APK

Approaches to replace mercury px625 battery

a. CRIS MR-9 adapter.

http://www.criscam.com/mercury_battery_adapters.php

Good: Uses Silver Oxide batteries SR-44. More available than other adapters.
Potential Bad: Expensive

b. PaulBG’s Adapter

http://www.paulbg.com/Nikon_F_meter_batteries.htm

Good: Cheaper. Uses Zinc Air batteries aka Hearing Aid battery.

Potential Bad: The battery will die every 3 months regardless of usage. It is cheap but you have to check on the battery.

c. DIY from old PX645 battery

Remove the centre piece of the PX645 battery leaving only the ring. Place a Zinc air battery in the centre and uses aluminum foil between the battery and ring.

http://www.kyphoto.com/classics/mercurybattery.html

4. these easiest way: wein cell px625

can easily get from amazon, antiquecamera.com, ebay and other online places. A genuine piece of wein cell usually costs around 6-7 US Dollars.

Important Features of Yashica TLRs

Paul @ Yashicatlr provides a very detailed overview of yashica models. i adapted the overview and selected something i feel more important to me.
here is the adapted overview chart. All credit goes to Paul @ Yashicatlr.