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Daily Archives: September 24th, 2012

The Sinar Norma CLA Guide

The Sinar Norma CLA Text Guide

An illustrated description of how to CLA a 4×5 Sinar Norma camera.

Download it here

The Sinar Norma CLA Video Guide

Read about this video guide.

To use the Sinar Norma CLA Video Guide, watch each one of the videos below in order. Click on the large number to the left of each chapter description to download that chapter’s video. This page links you to each chapter of the video and lets your computer figure out how to play it. VLC and Quicktime will both do a fine job of playing these videos.

If you would like to download the entire video guide in one fell swoop, there are four ways you can do so! Here’s the list:

  • Download an ISO (a full digital copy of the full DVD) of the Sinar Norma CLA Video Guide using Bittorrent. This is an 8GB file! Download this torrent file and use a bittorrent client to download the ISO. Then use something like VLC to play the ISO file on your computer.
  • Directly download the ISO of the video guide using your web browser. Click here to download the 8GB file.
  • Download a compressed version of the video guide using Bittorrent. This is a 1.5GB download. Download this torrent file and use a bittorrent client to download the compressed version of the video guide. Then use something like VLC to play the ISO file on your computer.
  • Directly download a compressed version of the video guide using your web browser. Click here to download part 1, and click here to download part 2.

And if you would like to download one chapter at a time, use these links:

Introduction
Chapter 1 describes the supplies you will need to complete a CLA on your Sinar Norma.
Chapter 2 overviews some general concepts that are helpful to know while you are doing a CLA on your Sinar Norma.
Chapter 3 describes some of the terminology that will be used in this video.
Chapter 4 begins disassembly of the camera.
Chapter 5 shows you how to remove the tilt locking screw.
Chapter 6 shows you how to separate the two halves of the fine focusing assembly.
Chapter 7 shows you how to clean the bottom side of the fine focus assembly.
Chapter 8 shows you how to remove the shift bar from the top side of the fine focus assembly.
Chapter 9 shows you how to clean the shift bar.
Chapter 10 shows you how to remove the swing assembly from the top side of the fine focus assembly.
Chapter 11 shows you how to reassemble the components on the lower part of the standard.
Chapter 12 shows you how to remount the shift bar.
Chapter 13 shows you how to rejoin the two halves of the fine focus assembly.
Chapter 14 shows you how to secure the gib setscrews.
Chapter 15 shows you how to clean and lubricate the lensboard holders.
Chapter 16 shows you how to remount the lensboard holder and service the monorail bushings.
Chapter 17 shows you the process of servicing an entire standard from beginning to end. This chapter presents a few new pieces of information, but most of it duplicates previous chapters, so the video has been sped up in parts.
Chapter 18 shows you how to lubricate the monorail.
Chapter 19 shows you how to adjust the standard rotation setting.
Chapter 20 shows you how to adjust the swing center detents so that both standards are parallel to each other in the swing axis.
Chapter 21 shows you how to adjust the tilt center detents so that both standards are parallel to each other in the tilt axis.After you complete this chapter, you’re done with your CLA!

via The Sinar Norma CLA Guide – Philip Morgan dot net.

 


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Weltaflex Photos


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Weltaflex

As a TLR fan in general and fanatic Lubitel 2 owner, I have been lusting after this old East German TLR camera for quite some time, with its sexy upmarket leatherette-and-steel cosmetics. Having finally obtained a copy, I have found it to be a highly underrated and effective piece of equipment.

SLR cameras do nothing for me. For me, it’s TLRs all the way. From what I can find out online, the Welta company in Dresden produced this lovely heavy TLR from around 1955 onwards. Given my twin obsession with Communist bloc cameras in general, and TLRs in particular, I have long longed to own one.

The Weltaflex is particularly interesting compared to the Soviet Lubitel series, because it is so obviously more ‘upmarket’ in intent, imitating the Rolleiflex series (right down to copycat title) rather than the pre-war Voigtlander. Though therefore comparable in both style and intent to Yashicas of the same era, it never acquired the fame of the Yashicas, and is therefore still available at far lower prices online.

The Weltaflex’s more ‘professional’ aspiration is particularly reflected in the generous aperture span — bulb, 1,2, 4, 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 300 on my model. F stops are 3.5, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16 and 22. It has a flash mount with synchronizer settings but no remote cable release mount. Incidentally, there appears to be at least two distinct models, one with a 1: 3.5 f 75mm Meritar lens and the other with a technically identical Rectan lens. The model I have reviewed here has the Meritar lens, and is also distinguished by a automatic frame stop device.

The Rectan-issue camera by contrast, or the ones I have seen, relies on the user using the normal rear mounted red window at the back to track frame progress. The manual forward winding system accordingly took me a little while to get used to on this camera—a small friction wheel on the right hand side can be set to advance film either frame by frame or to let the take-up spool spin freely, and a small metal ‘foot’ on the bottom inside right of the camera needs to be placed against an adjoining metal post for the frame winding system to work. Film is then loaded and wound to where arrows on back of the film intersect with a painted dot on back of the camera, not unlike a Yashimat, and after closing the back a small yellow window on the side of the camera then shows frame progression. This system theoretically prevents double exposures, since you cannot take another shot without winding on, although in practice (see photos) it does not always work.

The overall camera is an impressively heavy metal beast compared to a Lubitel, and has a Rolleiflex-style focusing wheel on the left hand side rather than the interlocking front cogs of the Lubitel system. Together with a pop-up internal magnifying glass inside the viewing hood, this makes it quite easy to create nicely focused shots, although the viewfinder is quite dim. The shutter is cocked at the front, as on a Lubitel, but the taking lever is a small and enchanting motorbike-style pedal on the right hand side of the camera. Some complain that this pedal is heavy to push down, but I find it absolutely fine, and certainly appreciate the fact that the cocking and taking mechanisms are not placed right next to each other. Moreover, I love the photos so much, particularly the sharpness and sometimes dreamy colour, that I have just bought another copy of the camera with the Rectan lens and technically simpler loading/frame tracking system for comparison/laughs.

Overall this is a great and unjustly neglected TLR, a fitting addition to any collection, and an interesting insight into the GDR’s relatively greater technological ambitions at the time.

Photos taken on Weltaflex using Sekonic L-398 light meter and Fujiifilm Superia 120 ISO 400 film. Product shots of Weltaflex courtesy of the ebay seller from whom I bought the camera.

via Welta Weltaflex: A Really Great East German TLR – Lomography.

 


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